• About
  • Archives
  • Categories
  • The Problem with Crows…

    2012 - 06.04

    My sister has a problem with crows, and in truth it’s not that many, it’s not like it’s a murder.  But she’s had a bad experience where they were aggressive and attacked her.  You would think that after something like that it would be easy to get the powers that be to take action.  Sadly not so much.  The evil masked arch-nemesis known only as “Strata Council” has been totally ineffectual, and incommunicado.

    Some people are wrongly under the belief that you can’t mess with birds, and that’s simply not true.  It is true that birds fall under the responsibility of the Ministry of Environment (here in BC anyway), so your local city is unlikely (and in some cases unable) to do anything about them.

    Here’s the quick summary:

    BIRDS

    • All birds are considered wildlife and are afforded full protection under the BC Wildlife Act.  A person commits an offence if the person except as provided by regulation or by an issued permit, possesses, takes, injures, molests or destroys a bird or its eggs.
    • Under the Wildlife Act Designation and Exemption Regulation 253/2000 Schedule C, point 2, the following species of birds and their nests or eggs can be destroyed without a permit: crows (except common ravens), black-billed magpies, European starlings, house sparrows, rock doves and brown-headed cowbirds.
    • Some species of birds are classified as game birds.  Hunting seasons and bag limits for game birds are published in the annual Hunting Regulation Synopsis.  This synopsis is available via a link on the Ministry of Environment’s website.
    • For injured birds phone the nearest animal rehabilitation centre.

    If you want to read more you can read the actual Wildlife Act: Designation and Exemption Regulation or just Schedule C.

    It’s always important to know the rules…

    So what do these exempt species look like?

    Crows except for the common raven:

    Wikipedia: Common Raven

    Wikipedia: Common Raven

    So this one you can’t touch, but all other “crows” are ok.

    The Black-billed Magpie:

    Wikipedia: Black-billed Magpie

    Wikipedia: Black-billed Magpie

    The Common Starling/European Starling:

    Wikipedia: Common Starling/European Starling

    Wikipedia: Common Starling/European Starling

    The House Sparrow:

    Wikipedia: House Sparrow

    Wikipedia: House Sparrow by Fir0002/Flagstaffotos under the GFDL

    The Rock Dove (aka: pigeon):

    Wikipedia: Blue Rock Pigeon

    Wikipedia: Blue Rock Pigeon

    And finally the Brown-headed Cowbird (not to be confused with the brown-haired Cowbel [which would be me]):

    Wikipedia: Brown-headed Cowbird (Male)

    Wikipedia: Brown-headed Cowbird (Male)

    Best make sure you double check the regulations before doing anything about the birds, but as of this writing it was legal to destroy their nests or eggs without a permit in BC.

    Tags:

    2 Responses to “The Problem with Crows…”

    1. Jen says:

      Your post is more informative that the gov’t site… it doesn’h have pics:-) But yes, when they live too close, crows can be a pain when their young are fledging. Any other time, I actually am quite fond of the birds. Their so intelligent, but haven’t figured out how to live in peace with neighbours who mean no harm. Hmm… sounds kind of like some human behaviour actually.

    Your Reply