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  • Specialized Skills

    2012 - 01.10

    Ever look back on your life and realize that you have highly specialized skills which you aren’t really sure how you developed?

    Well, I know how I developed these particular skills, but still they are strange, or I find them to be.  It’s probably pretty obvious with the upcoming relaunch of Abandoned Towers that I’ve kind of got that on the brain.  At the moment I’m migrating all of the existing poetry catalogue into the new poetry format, and creating author pages for the poets.  Essentially it’s a copy and paste operation, with a few bells and whistles.  In my experience however most people are really bad at migrating content.

    The problem: they want to ‘touch’ it while they do the migration.  Sometimes that’s appropriate, but most of the time you want to avoid touching the content, as it just slows you down.

    In this particular case, by the end I will have actually touched every single piece of content that goes on Abandoned Towers, and yet I will have read next to none of it.  I’m interested in speed and bulk, not in actually reading the content.  So sounds simple, right?

    “Yeah, I know right!?”

    Well the problem is since you’re not actually reading the content, and doing a repetitive operation, it can become quite mind-numbing, so the skill comes in actually keeping the speed up, while maintaining focus and accuracy.  So far I’m averaging about 20 poems an hour, which is quite respectable, not super awesome, but with the amount of meta data which needs to be extracted from the content (without reading it) makes it respectable.

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    2 Responses to “Specialized Skills”

    1. Karin says:

      After looking at the relatively small amount of content that was on the AT blog, I find myself even more in awe of what you do. I was mind-numbed after a VERY short amount of time. Appreciating you even more!

      • David says:

        Awe is good, and appropriate ;-) Realistically it’s one of those things that you develop if you need to. I expect it’s very similar to people working on an assembly line.

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